PSY 699 Reply to Colleague Erika’s Week  2 Post  Focus on Integrative and Collaborative Care

Your Topic: PSY 699 Reply to Colleague Erika’s Week 2 Post Focus on Integrative and Collaborative Care

Assignment Details: Focus on Integrative and Collaborative Care (SEE ERIKA’S POST BELOW)
Guided Response: You are encouraged to post your required replies earlier in the week to promote more meaningful interactive discourse in this discussion.

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Erika Rosales POST

Health care teams might achieve therapeutic goals for individual clients by obtaining as much information as possible about the presenting problems and looking out for their best interest, in addition to proper training and excellent communication. As mentioned by Auxier (2011), “although the concept of a multidisciplinary team is not a new one, redefining the team approach to include PCPs and BHPs requires a willingness to accept a paradigm shift of shared responsibility for a patient” (pg393). This supports health literacy by having trained individuals in the field, making sure that the principles of health literacy are being made aware of. Factors that might lead to the failure of CC/IC delivery model are lack of communication and fostering relationships, absence of trust, and lack of connections. As mentioned by Soklaridis (2009), “according to all of the CAM practitioners, the sense of not knowing what was available, or even what they could ask for, had implications in their everyday practice” (pg662). The lack of acceptance of the value or viability of the CC/IC model by stakeholders, lack of awareness of the clinical competencies of various members of the team, barriers to financial reimbursement for services, and lack of integration of support services within the practice cause a breakdown in efficacy by ineffectiveness use of the model by not integrating concepts and keeping an open line of communication. Supportive interventions within the CC/IC model that address such issues are proper training. As mentioned by Soklaridis (2009), “the majority of clinic practitioners said that a lack of communication and integration, coupled with the clinic’s unique location (in a hospital), meant that they felt isolated” (pg662). Methods of targeted intervention and education for PCPs that might alleviate potential issues for the CC/IC model are the integration of multiple factors and key components such as accessing information, coordinated assessment, and having the same health strategies. Essential elements of the collaborative care model involve patient-centered team care, population-based care, evidence-based care, accountable care, and measurement-based treatment.
The APA Ethical Code of Conduct can be used to guide decisions in these complex situations by providing a guideline for ethical behavior in the face of complicated circumstances. As mentioned by London (2013), “we, as mental health specialists, create ongoing opportunities to break down the barriers of interdisciplinary collaboration” (pg200). Potential work settings where you might find the CC/IC model is the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Defense, Mayo clinic, a primary care setting, in addition to home health, health centers, and critical care. As mentioned by Kelly (2012), “Integrated care models are routinely used in a host of public and private health delivery systems” (pg587). Ways in which this model provides more job satisfaction is in the success rate of the model directly affecting the success rates of practitioners, achieving more gratification in job satisfaction, and feeling proud about the care they universally distribute. As mentioned by Runyan (2011), “evidence for integrated care has been accumulated on a variety of clinical outcomes, including symptoms as well as disease management indicators, process outcomes (e.g., noshow rates and recognition rates), economic outcomes (cost-effectiveness and cost-offset), as well as patient and provider satisfaction” (pg60). By having a successful model to base educated assumptions on, more satisfaction is created with all participants.
Auxier, A., Farley, T., & Seifert, K. (2011). Establishing an integrated care practice in a community health center. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 42(5), 391–397. doi:10.1037/a0024982
Funderburk, J. S., Fielder, R. L., DeMartini, K. S., & Flynn, C. A. (2012). Integrating behavioral health services into a university health center: Patient and provider satisfaction. Families, Systems, & Health, 30(2), 130–140. doi:10.1037/a0028378
Kelly, J. F., & Coons, H. L. (2012). Integrated health care and professional psychology: Is the setting right for you? Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 43(6), 586–595. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/pro/
London, L. H., Watson, E. C., & Berger, J. (2013). An integrated primary care approach to help children B-HIP! Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology, 1(2), 196–200. doi:10.1037/cpp0000014
Runyan, C. N. (2011). Psychology can be indispensable to health care reform and the patient-centered medical home. Psychological Services, 8(2), 53–68. doi:10.1037/a0023454
Soklaridis, S., Kelner, M., Love, R., & Cassidy, D.J. (2009). Integrative health care in a hospital setting: Communication patterns between CAM and biomedical practitioners. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 23(6), 655–667. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/ijic20

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Health care teams might achieve therapeutic goals for individual clients by obtaining as much information as possible about the presenting problems

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