Cultural Diversity Lesson Plan Graded Project

Identifying ways of communicating that are familiar to the child

Lesson Plan Graded Project
Your project must be submitted as a Word document (.docx, .doc)*. Your project will be individually graded by your instructor and therefore will take up to a few weeks to grade.

Be sure that each of your files contains the following information:

Your name
Your student ID number
Your email address
Follow the instructions provided to complete your exam.

Be sure to keep a backup copy of any files you submit to the school!

Part 1: Weekly Lesson Plan
For Part 1 of this project, you must create a one-week lesson plan around a culturally diverse theme for a classroom of preschool children. Your lesson plan will incorporate the concept of multiculturalism into each of the core curriculum areas.

If you’re completing this assignment as a retake, you must decide on five new countries or cultures, and then plan all new activities in your work. You may not reuse any of the same countries or cultures or activities previously submitted as part of your Cultural Diversity graded assignments. Your work for this assignment must be original.

You’ll be submitting your project online, copy and paste the supplement Lesson Plan Template into a document file for your project. As you type your lesson plan into the template, the spaces will expand to fit your material.

Title Part 1 of your project “Lesson Plan.” Name your document file using your student information, like this: student number_exam number_last name_ first name.

When your lesson plan is complete, turn to Part 2.

Part 2: Detailed Activity Plan
Now that you’ve completed your weekly lesson plan, choose one of the days and provide a detailed activity plan worksheet for each activity that day. Use the Activity Plan Worksheet template located on your student portal or copy and use the one provided in this booklet. Complete a separate sheet for each activity.

Use every opportunity possible to include concepts about multiculturalism and diversity in your activities. For example, you might use your morning greeting to introduce the country of the day or the particular concept of diversity that you’ll highlight throughout your lessons, and your closing activities to prepare the students for the next day’s topics.

In addition, notice that lunch and snacks are included as part of the lesson plan. These are great opportunities for you and the children to experience culture and diversity, if you’ve planned well. The meals, snack, art, and language and literacy areas may also provide an opportunity for you to involve students’ parents in the classroom, as families share their own cultural past and particular artistic heritage.

You’ll be submitting your project online, download the supplement Activity Plan Worksheet and enter your responses electronically. Use one Activity Plan Worksheet per activity. As you type your lesson plan into the template, the spaces will expand to fit your material.

Grading Criteria
Your project will be evaluated according to the following criteria:

Contents of your lesson plan
Effective incorporation of the multicultural theme into daily activities
Completeness of both the lesson plan and the activities plans
Choice of culturally diverse activities appropriate for the age group
Clarity of description and procedure
Correct spelling, punctuation, and grammar
Your instructor will use the following rubric to grade your project:

Cultural Diversity Lesson Plan

Grading Criteria Exemplary Proficient Fair Poor Not Evident
Part One: Lesson plan was created around a culturally diverse theme that incorporates the concept of multiculturalism into each of the core curriculum areas 40 35–30–25 20–15 10–5 0
All activities are appropriate for preschool children 5 4 3 2 0
Part Two: Specific detail provided for one full day’s activities 50 45–40–35 30–25–20 15–10–5 0
Mechanics: Grammar, punctuation, and format 5 4 3 2 0
Hide Rubrics

Rubric Name: Lesson Plan Graded Project
Print Rubric

Criteria Exemplary
Proficient

Fair

Poor

Not Evident

Criterion Score

Part One: Lesson plan was created around a culturally diverse theme that incorporates the concept of multiculturalism into each of the core curriculum areas

40 points

35 points

20 points

10 points

0 points

Score of Part One: Lesson plan was created around a culturally diverse theme that incorporates the concept of multiculturalism into each of the core curriculum areas,

/ 40
All activities are appropriate for preschool children

5 points

4 points

3 points

2 points

0 points

Score of All activities are appropriate for preschool children,

/ 5
Part Two: Specific detail provided for one full day’s activities

50 points

45 points

30 points

15 points

0 points

Score of Part Two: Specific detail provided for one full day’s activities,

/ 50
Mechanics: Grammar, punctuation, and format

5 points

4 points

3 points

2 points

1 point

Score of Mechanics: Grammar, punctuation, and format,

/ 5
TotalScore of Lesson Plan Graded Project,

/ 100
OVERALL SCORE

EXEMPLARY
90 points minimum

PROFICIENT
80 points minimum

FAIR
70 points minimum

POOR
60 points minimum

NOT EVIDENT
0 points minimum

Strategies for Teaching Dual Language Learners
Read this assignment. Next, read Chapter 4, pages 76–113, in Getting it RIGHT for Young Children from Diverse Backgrounds. Then, read Section 7, pages 118–143, in your supplemental textbook 50 Strategies for Communicating and Working with Diverse Families.

One major concern of families and public school teachers is whether young children are ready for public school. Chapter 6 focuses on family and teacher concerns about school readiness and specific strategies in dual-language programs for young children. As an early educator, it’s important that you enhance your cross-cultural competence and your understanding of what a high-quality, dual-language program encompasses. In this assignment, you’ll be introduced to specific strategies to use in an English-language program to support students’ home languages while they’re learning English and support emergent literacy and school readiness.

As partners, families, and teachers set the stage for literacy skills. Literacy comprises more than just the skills that enable a person to read. Emergent literacy evolves gradually as a function of exposure to and interaction with print, and exposure to other children or adults who are using print. Children from middle-class families are likely to have been exposed to print materials in several ways. Their parents have probably read them stories since they were babies and encouraged them to learn their letters. They may have watched educational television or videos, been exposed to computer or smart phone keyboards, and played educational computer games. Often they’ve begun to sound out and recognize letters and can write their names. Children from lower-income families often haven’t had the same exposure to written language. As a result, these children have to catch up on basic skills.

As an early childhood educator, it’s your responsibility to support the literacy development of all children in your program by using language forms and communication activities that are already familiar to the children. This can be done by

Identifying ways of communicating that are familiar to the child
Respecting and incorporating familiar styles of communication into the program
Bridging the gap by assisting the child in learning school language genres in ways that expand, rather than replace, the child’s existing communication skills
There has been plenty of research about the influence of families and literacy events on emergent literacy skills. Parents and caregivers who read to their children and expose the children to other literacy events are building a foundation of language, writing, and reading that will help the children in the future. Children who aren’t read to or encouraged to use other language skills often have inferior emergent literacy skills.

Literacy can be taught through a variety of experiences, such as daily living and story-time activities. Intervention strategies for ELL students should be designed to bridge the gap between children’s early experiences and the school’s expectations while keeping in mind the need to affirm or expand their culture and experience.

Answer preview identifying ways of communicating that are familiar to the child

APA

659 words

Cultural Diversity Lesson Plan Graded Project was last modified: by