Discussion

List your preferred ethical lens and your primary values as determined by your completed ELI. 

After completing the ELI, review your personal assessment.respond to the following items:
(1) List your preferred ethical lens and your primary values as determined by your completed ELI.
(2) Explain whether you believe your results from the ELI are accurate. If you believe the results are not accurate, explain which ethical lens and values you believe are more reflective of you and why. Either way, support your position with specific examples of traits, characteristics, values, etc., that are important to you and guide you as you make decisions.
• Requirements: 250 words minimum initial post,

Attached is the results from the ELI assessment I did

You’re about to gain an important tool: knowledge of your ethical lens. Your ethical lens is the perspective through which you make ethical judgments. It informs decision-making in your personal and professional life and forms a significant part of who you are as a person.

Knowing your lens’s strengths and weaknesses will help you navigate the path toward ethical maturity. Learning about other lenses can deepen your understanding of others, letting you communicate and cooperate with people whose values you once found inscrutable.

All you need to do is examine 36 pairs of words or statements and choose the one that represents the value that’s most important to you, and read the results. You’ll find some choices are difficult—you could see yourself favoring either value depending on the situation. When torn between two answers, choose the one that would represent your values and the action you would take when your back is against the wall and you have to make a choice.

After you complete this instrument, you’ll be able to:

Determine which of the Four Ethical Lenses is your preferred lens.
Identify the values that are most important to you.
Discover the strength of your lens.
Explore the gifts of your lens.
Learn where your lens has blind spots and where it can tempt you toward unethical action.
View the perspectives of other lenses to contrast their perspective with your own.
Head or Heart?

The Ethical Lens Inventory is designed to help you identify your core ethical values. When we make ethical decisions, our core values are organized into four primary perspectives—the lenses. Which perspective you take depends on what side you take on two timeless debates: reason in tension with feelings (the head against the heart) and individual rights in tension with group rights.

Let’s examine the first tension: head against heart.

In choosing what action is the most ethical, we must often decide whether we will listen to our reason or our feelings. If you tend to pay attention to your reason, you’ll prefer an ethical lens that values rationality in resolving ethical dilemmas. If you tend to pay attention to your heart, you will prefer an ethical lens that values sensibility.

Two of the four ethical lenses emphasize using rationality – critical thinking – to determine what behavior is ethical.

Responsibilities Lens: Those who favor this lens use their reason to determine universal principles and rules by which they and others should live.
Relationship Lens: Those who favor this lens use the collective reason of their community to design and implement processes that protect the powerless and ensure justice for all.
The other two lenses emphasize using sensibility –intuition and emotions – to determine what behavior is ethical.

Results Lens: Those who favor this lens use their feelings and intuition to determine the choices that will contribute to their happiness, and by extension, the happiness of all.
Reputation Lens: Those who favor this lens use their feelings and intuition, as well as the traditions and wisdom of their community, to identify the character traits that are required for virtuous living—an example to emulate.
Do you prefer to analyze before you act, or do you prefer to leap into action and worry about the risk later? The answer is central to how you make ethical decisions.

Individual or Community?

The second set of values identified in the Ethical Lens Inventory looks at whether you focus on the individual or the community when you make ethical decisions.

Two of the ethical lenses emphasize individuals exercising their autonomy and determining for themselves what behavior is ethical.

Responsibilities Lens: Those who favor this lens use their reason to determine universal principles and rules by which they and others should live.
Results Lens: Those who favor this lens use their feelings and intuition to determine the choices that will contribute to their happiness, and by extension, the happiness of all.
The other two ethical lenses emphasize the community determining as a whole what behavior is ethical, favoring equality.

Relationship Lens: Those who favor this lens use the collective reason of their community to design and implement processes that protect the powerless and ensure justice for all.
Reputation Lens: Those who favor this lens use their feelings and intuition, as well as the traditions and wisdom of their community, to identify the character traits that are required for virtuous living—an example to emulate.
Do you value the safety and prosperity of the community, even if individuals must sacrifice, or do you promote the rights of individuals to make their own choices, trusting that people will restrain their self-interest? Context will affect how you answer the question, but you likely have a preference that shapes your outlook on life.

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0?ui=2&ik=e2e9419846&attid=0.1&permmsgid=msg-f:1742745287457832367&th=182f799b00e8fdaf&view=att&disp=safe&realattid=f_l7imo75f0

Answer preview List your preferred ethical lens and your primary values as determined by your completed ELI. 

APA

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