Researchers are studying the importance of these and other risk and resilience factors

Paragraphs needs paraphrasing Counseling

New counselors might also encounter situations in which they are being supervised by someone who is practicing outside of his or her boundaries of competency. For example, consider a supervisee who has just accepted a position providing intensive in-home counseling to lower-income clients. Both the supervisee and the supervisor were trained in a traditional program that taught how to interact with clients in a clinical office setting. The supervisor has never provided in-home counseling. The supervisee is struggling with being culturally sensitive and with establishing professional boundaries with clients in their own homes. However, when addressing the concern, the supervisor provides a rigid and formal approach to establishing boundaries. The supervisee is left feeling as if he or she is not forming a therapeutic bond with the clients, and the clients are left feeling as if the counselor is aloof and uncaring. Between the parameters of cautious and caring how do clinicians keep a level balance in high emotional situations? Can clinician become too involved and no longer see the line between what is deemed appropriate and what is not? I look forward to your thoughts on this.

Forensic Psychology

Anyone can develop PTSD at any age. This includes war veterans, children, and people who have been through a physical or sexual assault, abuse, accident, disaster, or other serious events. According to the National Center for PTSD, about 7 or 8 out of every 100 people will experience PTSD at some point in their lives. Women are more likely to develop PTSD than men, and genes may make some people more likely to develop PTSD than others.

Not everyone with PTSD has been through a dangerous event. Some people develop PTSD after a friend or family member experiences danger or harm. The sudden, unexpected death of a loved one can also lead to PTSD.

It is important to remember that not everyone who lives through a dangerous event develops PTSD. In fact, most people will not develop the disorder.

Many factors play a part in whether a person will develop PTSD. Some examples are listed below. Risk factors make a person more likely to develop PTSD. Other factors, called resilience factors, can help reduce the risk of the disorder.

Some factors that increase risk for PTSD include:

Living through dangerous events and traumas
Getting hurt
Seeing another person hurt, or seeing a dead body
Childhood trauma
Feeling horror, helplessness, or extreme fear
Having little or no social support after the event
Dealing with extra stress after the event, such as loss of a loved one, pain and injury, or loss of a job or home
Having a history of mental illness or substance abuse
Some factors that may promote recovery after trauma include:

Seeking out support from other people, such as friends and family
Finding a support group after a traumatic event
Learning to feel good about one’s own actions in the face of danger
Having a positive coping strategy, or a way of getting through the bad event and learning from it
Being able to act and respond effectively despite feeling fear
Researchers are studying the importance of these and other risk and resilience factors, including genetics and neurobiology. With more research, someday it may be possible to predict who is likely to develop PTSD and to prevent it.

Image preview for researchers are studying the importance of these and other risk and resilience factors

Researchers are studying the importance of these and other risk and resilience factors

APA

558 words

 

Researchers are studying the importance of these and other risk and resilience factors was last modified: by